Manila Churches

Manila Cathedral and San Agustin Church are the only remaining (out of eight) churches within the grounds Intramuros. They are architectures and are within walking distance of each other. They are perfect for Visita Iglesia.

Manila Cathedral

Manila Cathedral or the Manila Metropolitan Cathedral-Basilica serves as the see of the Archbishop of Manila. It has a colorful history that includes being destroyed by a typhoon, by fire, by earthquake not once but thrice, and by bombardment in 1945, towards the end of World War II. The present cathedral reopened on April 9, 2014, after two years of extensive repairs and improvements.

The Manila Cathedral and Plaza de Roma. Plaza de Roma is named as such to honor the Sacred College of Cardinals in Rome following the elevation of first Filipino cardinal, Rufino J. Santos.

The Manila Cathedral and Plaza de Roma. Plaza de Roma is named as such to honor the Sacred College of Cardinals in Rome following the elevation of first Filipino cardinal, Rufino J. Santos.

The bronze monument of Carlos IV of Spain was erected in 1824 as a tribute for the introduction of the smallpox vaccine in the Philippines. The fountain was built in 1886.

The bronze monument of Carlos IV of Spain was erected in 1824 as a tribute for the introduction of the smallpox vaccine in the Philippines. The fountain was built in 1886.

The façade of the cathedral has a Latin inscription Tibi cordi tuo immaculato concredimus nos ac consecramus that means “we consecrate to your immaculate heart and entrust to you for safekeeping. “You” refers to Blessed Virgin Mary, the principal patroness of the cathedral.

The façade of the cathedral has a Latin inscription Tibi cordi tuo immaculato concredimus nos ac consecramus that means “we consecrate to your immaculate heart and entrust to you for safekeeping. “You” refers to Blessed Virgin Mary, the principal patroness of the cathedral.

The interior of Manila Cathedral

The interior of Manila Cathedral

The interior of Manila Cathedral reminds me of Rivendell. The subdued color and elegant design are captivating.

The interior of Manila Cathedral reminds me of Rivendell. The subdued color and elegant design are captivating.

This Pieta is found on the left side of the cathedral, towards the entrance

This Pieta is found on the left side of the cathedral, near the entrance

Part of the double door of Manila Cathedral

Part of the double door of Manila Cathedral

The design of the window of Manila Cathedral

The design of the window of Manila Cathedral

One of the images near the entrance of the Manila Cathedral

One of the images near the entrance of the Manila Cathedral

San Agustin Church

The San Agustin Church was completed in 1607, and is considered the oldest building (in its original form) in Manila. In 1976, San Agustin Church was declared a National Historical Landmark by the local government and in 1993, a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Unlike its neighbor, the Manila Cathedral, San Agustin Church did not cave in to the handful of earthquakes that destroyed most of Manila.

San Agustin Church is famous for its breathtaking interiors that employ trompe l’oeil, the technique that makes two-dimensional objects look three-dimensional. This is obvious on the ceiling of the church.

The façade of San Agustin Church

The façade of San Agustin Church

Colofrul banderitas

Colofrul banderitas

The interiors of San Agustin Church. The ceiling displays trompe l'oeil to fool the eyes of the onlookers.

The interiors of San Agustin Church. The ceiling displays trompe l’oeil to fool the eyes of the onlookers.

Closer look at the ceiling of San Agustin Church

Closer look at the ceiling of San Agustin Church

The symmetrical interiors of San Agustin Church

The symmetrical interiors of San Agustin Church

Altar of San Agustin Church

Altar of San Agustin Church

Door of San Agustin Church and a crucifix found to the hallway leading to the museum

Door of San Agustin Church and a crucifix found to the hallway leading to the museum

The huge bell found in the hallway leading to the museum

The huge bell found in the hallway leading to the museum

How to get there: Take the LRT-1 to Carriedo Station. Board a jeepney going to Pier. Alight from the jeepney once you see Palacio del Gobernador. Manila Cathedral is perpendicular to Palacio del Gobernador.

From Manila Cathedral, turn left. Walk until you reach Gen. Luna Street, and then turn left. Walk straight until you see San Agustin Church.

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