Filipino Street Food, Part II

I mentioned in a previous entry about Filipino Street Food that Filipinos are experimental when it comes to culinary activities. The wide array of street food options, that may or may not cause stomachache and other things, is a testament of our love for risky business.

Here are more ubiquitous food options found in the cities of Quezon and Manila:

Balut or fertilized duck egg is one of the infamous Filipino street foods. It has been featured in Survivor US and Fear Factor. One balut costs P15 (US $0.34).

Balut or fertilized duck egg is one of the infamous Filipino street foods. It has been featured in Survivor US and Fear Factor. One balut costs P15.00 (US $0.34). This photo was taken near the MRT North Avenue Station. People flock to the balut vendor (and other street food vendor) after a stressful day of work or school capped by a stressful train ride.

Balut without its shell. The black or dark part is the feather of the young chick. :)

Balut without its shell. The black or dark part is the feather of the young chick.

Close-up of the young duck in balut. Balut goes well with salt and vinegar and it is best to eat when it is warm.

Close-up of the young duck in balut. Balut goes well with salt and vinegar and it is best to eat when it is warm.

Sinugbang bangus (roasted milkfish), P120 (US $2.69). Toyo (soy sauce) with chopped chili is the perfect dipping sauce for the bangus.

Sinugbang bangus (roasted milkfish), P120.00 (US $2.69). Toyo (soy sauce) with chopped chili is the perfect dipping sauce for the bangus.

Pork barbecue, P40 (US $0.90) per stick.

Pork barbecue, P40.00 (US $0.90) per stick.

Chicharon (fired pork rinds)   with laman (flesh), P220 (US $4.92) for a 100-gram pack.  Chicharon is perfect with vinegar.

Chicharon (fired pork rinds) with laman (flesh), P220.00 (US $4.92) for a 100-gram pack. Chicharon is perfect with vinegar.

Spicy chicharon (fried pork rinds) without the laman (flesh), P20.00 (US $0.45) for a 50-gram pack.

Spicy chicharon (fried pork rinds) without the laman (flesh), P20.00 (US $0.45) for a 50-gram pack.

Home-cooked Spanish style sardines, P150.00 (US $3.36).

Home-cooked Spanish style sardines, P150.00 (US $3.36).

Fried siomai (dimsum), 3 pieces for P10.00 (US $0.22).

Fried siomai (dimsum), 3 pieces for P10.00 (US $0.22).

Steamed siomai (dimsum), 3 pieces for P10.00 (US $0.22)

Steamed siomai (dimsum), 3 pieces for P10.00 (US $0.22)

Siomai steamer on a cart.

Siomai steamer on a cart.

Fired and steamed siomai with spicy sauce.

Fired and steamed siomai with spicy sauce.

Dynamite, siling mahaba (long chili) filled with cheese and meat and wrapped in lumpia wrapper. Three dynamites cost P25.00 (US $0.56)

Dynamite, siling mahaba (long chili) filled with cheese and meat and wrapped in lumpia wrapper. Three dynamites cost P25.00 (US $0.56). I bought 30 dynamites and ate 25 of them. πŸ™‚

Dynamite and its filling-ham and cheese.

Dynamite and its filling-ham and cheese.

Lugaw (porridge) has malagkit (sticky rice) as its base, with sliced saba (banana), camote (sweet potato) and malagkit balls, among other things. One small bowl is P20.00 (US $0.45)

Lugaw (porridge) has malagkit (sticky rice) as its base, with sliced saba (banana), camote (sweet potato) and malagkit balls, among other things. One small bowl is P20.00 (US $0.45)

Puto (steamed rice cake) wrapped in banana leaves, just like how they sell it in Iloilo. A pack of 3 costs P20.00 (US $0.45)

Puto (steamed rice cake) wrapped in banana leaves, just like how they sell it in Iloilo. A pack of 3 costs P20.00 (US $0.45).

Turon (banana wrapped in lumpia wrapper coated with brown sugar), P12.00 (US $0.27) per stick.

Turon (banana wrapped in lumpia wrapper coated with brown sugar), P12.00 (US $0.27) per stick.

One of the best turons I have tasted. Its filling is sugared bananas and jackfruit. One turon costs P15.00 (US $0.34)

One of the best turons I have tasted. Its filling is sugared bananas and jackfruit. One turon costs P15.00 (US $0.34)

Sliced camote (sweet potato) coated with brown sugar, P15.00 (US 0.34).

Sliced camote (sweet potato) coated with brown sugar, P15.00 (US 0.34).

Sliced camote (sweet potato) without the overflowing presence of brown sugar, P15.00 (US $0.34)

Sliced camote (sweet potato) without the overflowing presence of brown sugar, P15.00 (US $0.34)

A vendor near a gate of Intramuros cooks banana cue.

A vendor near a gate of Intramuros cooks banana cue.

Mango and guava, P40.00 (US $0.90) each

Mango and guava, P40.00 (US $0.90) each

Asin at sili (salt and chopped small chili pepper)  go well with fresh mango or guava.

Asin at sili (salt and chopped small chili pepper) go well with fresh mango or guava.

Gulaman, refreshing drink that costs P10.00 (US $0.22) per cup

Gulaman, refreshing drink that costs P10.00 (US $0.22) per cup

 

 

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